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'Grand Theft Auto' Publisher Gets Temporary Injunction Against Cheat Seller

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Grand Theft Auto Online is a blast until you run into an invincible player with an unlimited supply of heat-seeking rockets. Video games will always have cheaters, but there’s something different about encountering them in a game like GTA Online, where it can feel like the only way to deal with them is to log off.

As first spotted by Reuters, Take-Two Interactive, Grand Theft Auto's publisher, doesn’t like cheaters either and has taken steps to shut them down. A federal judge granted Take-Two interactive a temporary injunction against David Zipperer on August 16, telling Zipperer he could no longer manufacture or sell cheats designed for GTA Online. Zipperer is the guy behind the popular Menyoo and Absolute hacking programs.

The injunction is part of an ongoing lawsuit Take-Two first filed on March 23 against Zipperer, alleging that he violated its copyright by creating the cheat programs. “These alterations are intended to and do allow users to cheat while playing Take-Two’s games, both to (a) create benefits for themselves within the game that they have not purchased or earned, or (b) to alter the games of other players in the same gaming session without authorization,” Take-Two said in its initial filing.

According to court documents, Take-Two reached out to Zipperer prior to filing the lawsuit and tried to get him to take down the cheat programs on his own. “While Mr. Zipperer originally appeared cooperative and disabled access to the Menyoo program, it recently has come to Take-Two’s attention that Mr. Zipperer distributed a new cheating program titled Absolute,” court documents said. “Take-Two demanded on multiple occasions that Mr. Zipperer cease his willful and infringing conduct. Mr. Zipperer has refused to comply. Upon information and belief, Mr. Zipperer continues to infringe Take-Two’s rights.”

Take-Two initially pursued five different charges: two breaches of copyright infringement, breach of contract for breaking GTA Online’s end user license agreement, tortious breach of contract, and unfair competition. It argued that the cheat programs violated its copyright because Zipperer had to copy and alter portions of the game’s code to craft his cheat programs.

Zipperer attempted to change the venue and get the charges dismissed and Take-Two sought a temporary injunction to get him to stop selling the cheats ahead of a jury trial where it will seek a minimum of $500,000 in damages. A federal judge dismissed Take-Two’s unfair competition charge, but granted the injunction.

“Mr. Zipperer is hereby preliminarily enjoined from (a) directly or indirectly infringing Take-Two's copyrights in Grand Theft Auto V and its other video games; (b) creating derivative works based upon any portion of Grand Theft Auto V or Take-Two's other copyrighted video games; (c) producing or distributing any computer programs that alter Grand Theft Auto V or Take-Two's other copyrighted video games, including without limitation Menyoo and Absolute; and (d) participating or assisting in any such infringing activity,” read the court documents.

Take-Two has been aggressive about shutting down cheating programs in the past, even going so far as to serve legal notice against modding programs used to tweak Grand Theft Auto’s single player experience. However, Grand Theft Auto's developer Rockstar Games has previously stepped in to prevent Take-Two from shutting down mods that allow players to alter the game without interfering with other players' online experience, as seems to be the case with Zipperer's programs.



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fxer
2 days ago
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I'm still unclear on how cheats where the publisher controls the server can be so prevalent. do they just not want to go through the effort of coding in server side validation?
Bend, Oregon
acdha
2 hours ago
I’ve heard that it’s usually performance related but that seems like a cop out to me for something like this.
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jepler
17 hours ago
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remember, being able to inspect and modify software you paid for might cause irrevocable harm to somebody's business plan...
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm

Timeline of audio formats

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An audio format is a medium for sound recording and reproduction. The term is applied to both the physical recording media and the recording formats of the audio content—in computer science it is often limited to the audio file format, but its wider use usually refers to the physical method used to store the data.

Music is recorded and distributed using a variety of audio formats, some of which store additional information.

Timeline of audio format developments[edit]

Year Physical media formats Recording formats
1860 Phonautogram Mechanical analog; sound waveform transcribed to paper or glass
1883 Piano roll Mechanical digital (Vacuum operated piano)
1886 Music Box disc Mechanical digital (Vacuum operated music box)
Late

1880s

Brown Wax Cylinder Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, vertical stylus motion - could be re-recorded
Organ Cob Mechanical digital (Vacuum operated organ)
Ediphone, Dictaphone Mechanical analog, the Ediphone and subsequent wax cylinders used in Edison's other product lines continued to be sold up until 1929 when the Edison Manufacturing Company folded.
Phonograph disk (Emile Berliner Patent) Mechanical analog; lateral grooves, horizontal stylus motion
1894 Pathé cylinder Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, vertical stylus motion
1898 Wire recording Analog; magnetization; DC bias
1901 10'' 78rpm Record Mechanical analog; lateral grooves, horizontal stylus motion - made from shellac
1902 Edison Gold Moulded Record Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, horizontal stylus motion - made from hard black wax - 160rpm standard - 100 threads per inch
1903 12'' 78rpm record Mechanical analog; lateral grooves, horizontal stylus motion
Gramophone Postcard Mechanical analog; lateral grooves, horizontal stylus motion
1905 Centre-start phonograph Record Mechanical analog; lateral grooves, horizontal stylus motion, starts from the centre of the disc
Pathé Disc Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, vertical stylus motion
1907 Indestructible Record Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, vertical stylus motion - made from black celluloid with cardboard and inner metal bands
1908 Amberol Cylinder Record Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, vertical stylus motion - made from hard black wax - 160rpm standard - 200 threads per inch
1912 Diamond Disc Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, vertical stylus motion - made from shellac
Blue Amberol cylinder record Mechanical analog; vertical grooves, vertical stylus motion - made from blue celluloid with plaster of paris core - 160rpm standard - 200 threads per inch
1925 Electrical cut record Mechanical analog; electrically cut from amplified microphone signal, lateral grooves, horizontal stylus motion, discs at 7", 10", 12", most at 78 rpm
1930 Filmophone flexible record Mechanical analog; lateral groove, horizontal stylus movement - made from cellulose of various colours - 78rpm
1930s Reel-to-reel, magnetic tape Analog; magnetization; AC "bias" dramatically increases linearity/fidelity, tape speed at 30 ips, later 15 ips and other refined speeds: 7½ ips, 3¾ ips, 1⅞ ips
Electrical transcriptions Mechanical analog; electrically cut from amplified microphone signal, high fidelity sound, lateral or vertical grooves, horizontal or vertical stylus motion, most discs 16" at 33⅓ rpm
1932 Durium Record Mechanical analog; lateral groove - made from a brown resin ("Durium)
1942 SoundScriber Mechanical Analog; vertical groove, 4–6 inch discs, it recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs
1947 Dictabelt (Memobelt) Analog, medium consisting of a thin, plastic belt 3.5" wide that was placed on a cylinder and rotated like a tank tread, developed by the Dictaphone company in 1947
1948 Vinyl LP record (Columbia) Analog, with preemphasis and other equalization techniques (LP, RIAA); lateral grooves, horizontal stylus motion; discs 7", 10" and 12" at 33⅓ rpm, 1st LP Columbia ML 4001 Milstein, Mendelssohn Violin Concerto
1949 Vinyl 45 record (RCA) Analog 45 rpm vinyl 7" disk, first 45 pressed "PeeWee the Piccolo" RCA 47-0147 Indianapolis
1950 Tefifon Electro-mechanical analog, vinyl belt housed in a cassette, used an embossing technique using a stylus to imprint the information, was the first thing to resemble a modern audio cassette
16 2/3rpm vinyl record Mechanical analog; lateral groove, horizontal stylus motion - played at half the regular speed of an LP
1951 Minifon P55 Analog, magnetic wire on reel, 30 cm/s or about 11.8 ips was quickly adopted by many governments as being the ultimate "spy" recorder of its day
1957 Stereophonic vinyl record Analog, with pre-emphasis and other equalization techniques. Combination lateral/vertical stylus motion with each channel encoded 45 degrees to the vertical
1957 Dictet Analog, ¼ tape, 2.48 in/s, (3" reels housed 5.875 x 3 x .4375 inch cassette), developed by the Dictaphone Corp, was the very first dictation machine to use magnetic tape cassettes
1958 RCA tape cartridge (Sound Tape) (Magazine Loading Cartridge) Analog, ¼ inch wide tape (stereo & mono), 3¾ in/s & 1.875 in/s, one of the first attempts to offer reel-to-reel tape recording quality in a convenient format for the consumer market
1959 NAB Cart Tape (Fidelipac) Analog, ¼ inch wide tape in cartridge, 7½ in/s & 15 in/s, Introduced in 1959 by Collins Radio, the cart tape format was designed for use by radio broadcasters to play commercials, bumpers and announcements
1962 4-Track (Muntz Stereo-Pak) Analog, 14-inch-wide (6.4 mm) tape, 3¾ in/s, endless-loop cartridge
1963 Compact cassette Analog, with bias. 0.15 inches (3.81 mm) tape, 1⅞ ips. 1970: introduced Dolby noise reduction
1964 Sanyo Micro Pack 35
Channel Master 6546
Westinghouse H29R1
¼ inch wide tape housed in a transparent cartridge measuring 2.6 x 2.9 x 1.9 inches, tape was stored on two reels residing atop one another, keeping the cartridge compact
1964 Sabamobil A cartridge format for embedding and easy handling usual 3-inch-tape-reels with ¼ inch tape, compatible to reel-to-reel audio recording in 3¾ ips.
1965 8-Track (Stereo-8) Analog, ¼ inch wide tape, 3¾ in/s, endless-loop cartridge
DC-International system Analog cassette format introduced by Grundig, Telefunken and Blaupunkt: 120 x 77 x 12 mm cassette with ¼ inch wide tape run at 5.08cm per second.
1966 PlayTape Analog, ⅛ inch wide tape, endless-loop cartridge, introduced by Frank Stanton
1969 Microcassette Analog, ⅛ inch wide tape, used generally for note taking, mostly mono, some stereo (developed in the early '80s). 2.4 cm/s or 1.2 cm/s
Minicassette Analog, ⅛ inch wide tape, used generally for note taking, 1.2 cm/s
1970 Quadraphonic 8-Track (Quad-8) (Q8) Analog, ¼ inch wide tape, 3¾ in/s, 4-channel stereo, endless-loop cartridge
1971 Quadraphonic Vinyl Record (CD-4) (SQ Matrix) Analog, introduced by CBS Records

Recorded two tracks on both stereo channels, requiring a decoder to hear all four tracks. Despite this, the format is playable on any LP turntable.

1971 HiPac Analog, a successor of the 1966 PlayTape, using tape width of the 1963 Compact Cassette, Japan only
1976 Dolby Stereo cinema surround sound Analog
Elcaset Analog, name comes from "L-Cassette/Large Cassette"
1978 LaserDisc Analog; vertical groove, read by a laser
1982 Compact Disc (CD-DA) Digital. Linear PCM (LPCM)
1983 Betamax Digital Audio Digital
1986 High Definition Compatible Digital (HDCD) Digital. Redbook compatible physical CD containing 20–24 bit information (uses linear pulse-code modulation (LPCM)
1987 Digital Audio Tape (DAT) Digital.

This audio format famously caused controversy among recording companies when released due to the potential of perfect digital copies to increase piracy[1]

1988 AIFF (File Format) Digital. Audio Interchange File Format (AIFF)
1992 Digital Compact Cassette (DCC) Digital, ⅛ inch wide tape, 1⅞ in/s, introduced by Philips and Matsushita in late 1992, marketed as the successor to the standard analog compact cassette
WAV (File Format) Digital. named after the waveform created by a sound wave
Dolby Digital Cinema Sound Digital. also known as Dolby Stereo Digital until 1994
MiniDisc (MD)[2] Digital. Adaptive Transform Acoustic Coding (ATRAC)
1993 DTS, SDDS, MP3 (File Formats) Digital. Digital Theatre System (DTS), Sony Dynamic Digital Sound (SDDS), MPEG-1 Audio Layer III (MP3)
1994 TwinVQ Digital.
1995 RealAudio[2]
1997 DVD Digital. Dolby Digital, Digital Theatre System (DTS)
DTS-CD Digital. DTS Audio
1999 DVD-Audio Digital. Including Meridian Lossless Packing (MLP), Linear PCM (LPCM), Dolby Digital (AC-3) and Digital Theatre System (DTS)
Super Audio CD (SACD) Digital. Direct Stream Digital
WMA (File Format) Digital. Windows Media Audio
TTA (File Format) Digital. The True Audio Lossless Codec
2000 FLAC (File Format) Digital. Free Lossless Audio Codec
APE (File Format) Digital. Monkey's Audio
2001 AAC (File Format) Digital. Advanced audio coding
2003 DualDisc Digital. Multiple formats encoded onto the same disc
2004 ALE or ALAC (File Formats) Digital. Apple Lossless
2005 HD DVD Digital. Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD Master Audio
2006 Blu-ray Disc Digital. Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD Master Audio
2008 slotMusic Digital. Usually at 320 kbit/s MP3 on microSD or microSDHC
Blu-spec CD Digital. PCM

References[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


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fxer
2 days ago
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Bend, Oregon
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Scenes from the ant colony's growing magician problem

jwz
2 Comments and 5 Shares
probablybadrpgideas:
If Cthulhu can be summoned by humans who are so far beneath it, why can't humans be summoned by ants?

The answer is they should be.

20thcenturyvole:

Well if a bunch of ants formed a circle in my house I'd certainly notice, try to figure out where they'd all come from, and possibly wreak destruction there.

weasowl:

That's why knowing and correctly pronouncing the true name is so important to the ritual. Imagine how impossible it would be to not go take a look if the circle of ants started chanting your name.

And they're like, you can't leave because we drew a line made of tiny crystals - now you have to do us a favor.

And you're like, let's just see where this goes "yup, you got me... what's the favor?"

and usually the favor is like, "kill this one ant for us" or "give me a pile of sugar" and you're like... okay? and you do, because why not, it isn't hard for you and boy is this going to be a fucking story to tell, these fucking ants chanting your name and wanting a spoonful of sugar or whatever.

And SOMEtimes you get asked for things you can't really do, one of them, she's like, "I love this ant but she won't pay any attention to me, make me important to her" and you're like... um? how? So you just kill every ant in the colony except the two of them, ta-da! problem solved! and the first ant is like horrified whisper "what have I done"

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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fxer
2 days ago
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"and you're like... um? how? So you just kill every ant in the colony except the two of them, ta-da! problem solved!"
Bend, Oregon
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sness
1 hour ago
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dark
milky way

A Sound Card Before Its Time

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fxer
2 days ago
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Bend, Oregon
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Cannabis Producer Gets $4 Billion Investment From Beer Company

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Canopy Growth Corp., the parent company of Corona beer and other alcoholic drinks, is expanding its partnership with a Canadian pot producer, betting on the continued growth in the medical and recreational cannabis markets.

The giant influx of cash from Constellation Brands is the largest strategic investment in the cannabis market to date. It nearly quadruples the alcohol company's stake in Canopy Growth to 38 percent.

(Image credit: Richard Drew/AP)

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fxer
2 days ago
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Bend, Oregon
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Colorado Baker Sues State Again, After Refusing To Make Cake For Transgender Woman

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Baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, manages his shop in Lakewood, Colo., on Wednesday. He

Jack Phillips, who prevailed in a Supreme Court case about his refusal to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, is suing Colorado in a case involving a cake celebrating gender transition.

(Image credit: Hyoung Chang/Denver Post via Getty Images)

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fxer
2 days ago
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thanks for dodging the issue supreme court, you've really cleared things up
Bend, Oregon
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