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‘The Expanse’ finds a new home on Amazon Prime

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After an outcry among fans following Syfy’s discontinuation of the series on its network, The Expanse will be getting a fourth season on Amazon Prime after an announcement from Jeff Bezos.

Bezos revealed the news at the International Space Development Conference where members of the show’s cast were amongst those in the audience.

The show based on the book series by James S.A. Corey is currently in its third season on the Syfy network. The critically-acclaimed political conspiracy series set in a colonized solar system of the future has been heralded as one of the network’s best but it couldn’t find high ratings on Syfy, leaving Alcon Entertainment to begin shopping the show around to different networks earlier this month to find a home for the fourth season.

Amazon will certainly bring a wider audience to the show, and with Amazon still trailing Netflix in terms of original content, bringing over a big fanbase is beneficial to the company’s video streaming platform as well.

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fxer
3 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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#MapleRidge crews are responding to Maple Ridge Elementary for a child stuck in a tube

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crews are responding to Maple Ridge Elementary for a child stuck in a tube

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fxer
9 hours ago
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it's called the internet
Bend, Oregon
dreadhead
1 day ago
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Vancouver Island, Canada
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There's real reasons for Linux to replace ifconfig, netstat, et al

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One of the ongoing system administration controversies in Linux is that there is an ongoing effort to obsolete the old, cross-Unix standard network administration and diagnosis commands of ifconfig, netstat and the like and replace them with fresh new Linux specific things like ss and the ip suite. Old sysadmins are generally grumpy about this; they consider it yet another sign of Linux's 'not invented here' attitude that sees Linux breaking from well-established Unix norms to go its own way. Although I'm an old sysadmin myself, I don't have this reaction. Instead, I think that it might be both sensible and honest for Linux to go off in this direction. There are two reasons for this, one ostensible and one subtle.

The ostensible surface issue is that the current code for netstat, ifconfig, and so on operates in an inefficient way. Per various people, netstat et al operate by reading various files in /proc, and doing this is not the most efficient thing in the world (either on the kernel side or on netstat's side). You won't notice this on a small system, but apparently there are real impacts on large ones. Modern commands like ss and ip use Linux's netlink sockets, which are much more efficient. In theory netstat, ifconfig, and company could be rewritten to use netlink too; in practice this doesn't seem to have happened and there may be political issues involving different groups of developers with different opinions on which way to go.

(Netstat and ifconfig are part of net-tools, while ss and ip are part of iproute2.)

However, the deeper issue is the interface that netstat, ifconfig, and company present to users. In practice, these commands are caught between two masters. On the one hand, the information the tools present and the questions they let us ask are deeply intertwined with how the kernel itself does networking, and in general the tools are very much supposed to report the kernel's reality. On the other hand, the users expect netstat, ifconfig and so on to have their traditional interface (in terms of output, command line arguments, and so on); any number of scripts and tools fish things out of ifconfig output, for example. As the Linux kernel has changed how it does networking, this has presented things like ifconfig with a deep conflict; their traditional output is no longer necessarily an accurate representation of reality.

For instance, here is ifconfig output for a network interface on one of my machines:

 ; ifconfig -a
 [...]
 em0: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
    inet 128.100.3.XX  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 128.100.3.255
    inet6 fe80::6245:cbff:fea0:e8dd  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
    ether 60:45:cb:a0:e8:dd  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
 [...]

There are no other 'em0:...' devices reported by ifconfig, which is unfortunate because this output from ifconfig is not really an accurate picture of reality:

; ip -4 addr show em0
[...]
  inet 128.100.3.XX/24 brd 128.100.3.255 scope global em0
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
  inet 128.100.3.YY/24 brd 128.100.3.255 scope global secondary em0
    valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

This interface has an IP alias, set up through systemd's networkd. Perhaps there once was a day when all IP aliases on Linux had to be set up through additional alias interfaces, which ifconfig would show, but these days each interface can have multiple IPs and directly setting them this way is the modern approach.

This issue presents programs like ifconfig with an unappealing choice. They can maintain their traditional output, which is now sometimes a lie but which keeps people's scripts working, or they can change the output to better match reality and probably break some scripts. It's likely to be the case that the more they change their output (and arguments and so on) to match the kernel's current reality, the more they will break scripts and tools built on top of them. And some people will argue that those scripts and tools that would break are already broken, just differently; if you're parsing ifconfig output on my machine to generate a list of all of the local IP addresses, you're already wrong.

(If you try to keep the current interface while lying as little as possible, you wind up having arguments about what to lie about and how. If you can only list one IPv4 address per interface in ifconfig, how do you decide which one?)

In a sense, deprecating programs like ifconfig and netstat that have wound up with interfaces that are inaccurate but hard to change is the honest approach. Their interfaces can't be fixed without significant amounts of pain and they still work okay for many systems, so just let them be while encouraging people to switch to other tools that can be more honest.

(This elaborates on an old tweet of mine.)

PS: I believe that the kernel interfaces that ifconfig and so on currently use to get this information are bound by backwards compatibility issues themselves, so getting ifconfig to even know that it was being inaccurate here would probably take code changes.


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fxer
22 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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This Super-Crispy Honey Butter Fried Chicken Is Killer With Waffles

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This fried chicken's rugged and scraggy crust is inspired by Popeyes, but the caramelized-honey drizzle and a dusting of chili spice make it unique. Read More
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fxer
22 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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This Company Is Making a 'Bop-It' You Can Fuck

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I will never again think fondly of that mechanical voice from my childhood Bop-It toy, commanding “Flick it! Pull it! Twist it!” That memory is over and ruined, thanks to this cursed amalgamation of a sex toy from adult game maker Nutaku called the Flick ‘N’ Jerk.

In a press release, Nutaku says it was created in celebration of National Masturbation Day, which falls on May 28. The toy is a 4-in-1 wheel of sexual stimulation in the same ninja-star shape of the Bop-It Extreme, each prong featuring a different toy: A Fleshlight-esque “stroker,” a dildo, a vibrator, and buttplug that “fits every butthole!” Bold claim for a bold invention.

I’ll be honest, every orifice on my body is clenched at the sight of this thing. How would one even get any part of this... up in there? In anywhere? How do you hold it for the fleshlight part? How do you maneuver it at ALL? I have questions.

Needing company for my misery, I showed the Fuck-It to discerning teledildonics developer Kyle Machulis over Twitter messages. His reaction, after the initial shock, was not what I expected: “I love it,” he said. “That is amazing and I'm frankly surprised it doesn't exist already.” In hindsight, I shouldn’t be surprised at this reaction, Machulis’ recent projects including a system for turning any game into something you can put up your butt.

“I cannot... I can't figure out... the ergonomics!!!” I replied, grasping for some solidarity in my horror. “Leave that to the properly motivated user,” Machulis said. “They always manage to find a way, even if it isn't a good idea.”

Read more: This Game Has You Testing Out Sexbots to Save Humanity

I’ve requested a review unit of the Flick ‘N’ Jerk so I can decode this puzzle for myself, and a spokesperson for Nutaku has promised to send me one “when they ship,” which will be “probably in December.” That’s fine. I will wait with the patients of a thousand monks if I have to. The Fuck-It will be my holy grail.



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fxer
22 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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Court docs show Apple knew about the bendiness of the iPhone 6, 6 Plus

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Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

Newly released court documents reveal just how much Apple apparently knew about the iPhone 6's and 6 Plus' propensity to bend. A report by Motherboard shows parts of the documents that were made public by US District Court Judge Lucy Koh (most of the documents remain sealed), and they say Apple's internal testing found that iPhone 6 and 6 Plus models were indeed bendier than previous iPhones.

"The iPhone 6 was 3.3 times more likely to bend than the iPhone 5s" and "the iPhone 6 Plus was 7.2 times more likely to bend than the iPhone 5s," the document states. Judge Koh wrote that "one of the major concerns Apple Identified prior to launching the iPhones was that they were 'likely to bend more easily when compared to previous generations.'"

Flashback to Bendgate

The bending issues with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus date back to shortly after the phones' release in September 2014. Many users reported their new smartphones bending easily from regular use, like sticking the phone in their back pocket. At the time, Apple highlighted the vigorous testing it puts handsets through before release, including a three-point bending test.

"Bendgate" news slowly died down until early 2016, when iPhone 6 and 6 Plus users began reporting issues with their smartphones' displays. The problems—which included touchscreens with a flickering gray bar at the top, touchscreens with intermittent response, and touchscreens that stopped working completely—were collectively dubbed "Touch Disease."

Loose Touch IC chips were later identified as the source of Touch Disease. These touchscreen-controlling chips became unseated from the logic board due to bending and flexing with normal use. The problem affected more than just a handful of users and prompted Apple to start the iPhone 6 Plus Multi-Touch Repair Program, which would repair handsets with touchscreen input problems for $149.

It also prompted users to file a class-action lawsuit against the company for allegedly misleading them about Touch Disease. Apple was forced to hand over internal documents as part of the suit, and that's where these new details come from.

A late fix

Apple eventually acknowledged Touch Disease, saying it only affected iPhones "dropped multiple times on a hard surface and then incurring further stress on the device." But the company has not said anything publicly about the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus being more susceptible to bending, a design issue that seems to have contributed to Touch Disease problems.

The details made public from these court documents show Apple did indeed know that the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus were more likely to bend than earlier iPhone models, despite the company denying any engineering issues with the smartphones.

According to the documents, Apple investigated the issue and came up with a fix—reinforcing part of the logic board with an epoxy to prevent dislodging. However, this design change wasn't implemented until May 2016, and it was only a fix for new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus models being produced. Apple moved the touchscreen controlling-chips in question from the logic board to the display construction with the release of the iPhone 6S. It's thought that those later iPhone 6 models were not as susceptible to Touch Disease because of the new placement of the touchscreen-controlling chips.

Ars has reached out to Apple for further comment.

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fxer
22 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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