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New Design Makes It Easier to Save Sites & Log In

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Today you may notice a refreshed, modern look to your LastPass in-field menus, the latest in our mission to simplify your digital life. We’re very excited to launch this updated design and functionality that makes it even easier to save sites, generate new passwords, and navigate LastPass in your browser.

Our new design and user experience, available now on Google Chrome, is a more intuitive flow that gives you straightforward, simple access when logging in to and saving sites, and updating your passwords. If you don’t see the update yet, don’t worry; you’ll see it soon. We’re slowly updating users to this new experience over the coming weeks.

Take a look around to see how we’ve simplified the design, so you can get to your passwords quickly and save even more time with LastPass.

See the new look and feel.

You’ll see many of the updates when you interact with the LastPass in-field icons — you know, the tiny LastPass icon you see in the form fields for username or email address and password. That’s known as the in-field icon. When you’re logged in to your LastPass account now, the in-field menus that you see from LastPass will have a fresh look and feel. This new design is clean and matches what you see in your vault, as well as on LastPass.com, and creates a more consistent experience.

save-a-site_log-in

Just log in.

To start exploring the updates, navigate to a site where you have your information stored in LastPass. Per usual, click the LastPass in-field icon screen-shot-2017-01-04-at-11-58-01 in the username or email address field, and you’ll see the sleek new in-field menu. If you have more than one account for the website, you’ll see all of them listed here, and you can click on the email address or username to fill the account you want to log in to.

If you click next to your email address, you’ll see a menu where you can copy your username, password, or the login URL with just one click, making it simple and fast to manage your accounts. You can also Edit to open up the site in your vault and make additional changes to your site.

Save a new site.

The next time you save a new site to LastPass, you’ll notice a much more modern user flow (say goodbye to the green bar!) that makes it easier to understand exactly what you’re saving and to where.

All you have to do is log in with an account that is not saved to LastPass yet. Once you log in, you’ll see a new window below the LastPass icon in your browser bar.

save-a-site_add-site

Before you click Add, hover over your email address/username and you’ll see an Edit button. Select that to make changes to your site without ever needing to go into your vault. From the Edit screen, you can select the folder where you’d like it saved and confirm your username and password. Click Add to save the site to your vault.

save-a-site_add-site_details

Generate or change a password.

When you’re creating a new account, it can be a burden to generate a new password, and that burden is gone with our update. Once you enter your username or email address, click the screen-shot-2017-01-04 icon in the password field to populate the generate password menu.
save-a-site_password-generateYou can click the Generate and fill button to allow LastPass to generate a random, strong and unique password for the account. Don’t worry that you don’t know it – LastPass will save it to your vault so you don’t need to remember it.

If you have specific password requirements, such as length or characters, select More Options to customize your password with characters, numbers, length, and even specify if it should be easy to read or say.

We hope you enjoy this new experience not only because it looks a whole lot better, but also because it makes LastPass easier and more intuitive to use everyday as you live your online life. 

Haven’t tried LastPass yet? You can download it today and get LastPass free on all of your devices, so you can start better organizing and protecting your passwords.

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fxer
2 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
DMack
1 hour ago
your previous lastpass share mentioned BitWarden - have you tried that out yet? It appears to be really new
fxer
35 minutes ago
Haven't tried it, looks like BitWarden is currently free because Microsoft BizSpark is funding it. But I also haven't had enough of a problem with LastPass to merit looking into a switch
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A history of the Amiga, part 10: The downfall of Commodore

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Enlarge (credit: Jeremy Reimer)

More than 30-plus years after it debuted, the Amiga continues to fascinate all sorts of computer lovers. For years our Jeremy Reimer has been thoroughly documenting its unique journey in his reoccurring series, and this is his latest entry. If new to the saga, start with part one (on the machine's genesis) and make sure to read the latest entry (part nine on the Video Toaster) before digging in.

As the 1990s began, Commodore should have been flying high. The long-awaited new Amiga models with better graphics, the A1200 and A4000, were finally released in 1992. Sales responded by increasing 17 percent over the previous year. The Video Toaster had established a niche in desktop video editing that no other computer platform could match, and the new Toaster 4000 promised to be even better than before. After a rocky start, the Amiga seemed to be hitting its stride.

Unfortunately, this success wouldn’t last. In 1993, sales fell by 20 percent, and Commodore lost $366 million. In the first quarter of 1994, the company announced a loss of $8.2 million—much better than the previous four quarters, but still not enough to turn a profit. Commodore had run into financial difficulties before, particularly in the mid-'80s, but this time the wounds were too deep. Sales of the venerable Commodore 64 had finally collapsed, and the Amiga wasn’t able to fill the gap quickly enough. The company issued a statement warning investors of its problems, and the stock plunged. On April 29, 1994, Commodore International Limited announced that it was starting the initial phase of voluntary liquidation of all of its assets and filing for bankruptcy protection. Commodore, once the savior of the Amiga, had failed to save itself.

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fxer
22 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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SpaceX is about to launch one of its final expendable rockets

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Enlarge / The landed Falcon 9 rocket that launched the Iridium satellites on Jan. 14, 2017. (credit: SpaceX)

After successfully returning to flight on Jan. 14th, SpaceX will make its next launch from Cape Canaveral no earlier than Jan. 30th. With this mission from a new pad at Launch Complex 39A, SpaceX will loft the EchoStar 23 communications satellite to geostationary transfer orbit.

This is a heavy satellite, weighing 5.5 metric tons, and getting it out to about 40,000km from the surface of the Earth will require pretty much all of the lift capacity of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. This would leave almost no propellant for the Falcon 9 rocket to fire its engines to slow down, make a controlled descent through the Earth's atmosphere, and attempt a difficult landing on a drone ship.

On Saturday, in response to a question on Twitter, SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk confirmed that the upcoming EchoStar launch will therefore indeed be expendable. "Future flights will go on Falcon Heavy or the upgraded Falcon 9," he added.

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fxer
1 day ago
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Bend, Oregon
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A+E Networks Chief Tests Limits in Bid to Revive Channels’ Fortunes

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Nancy Dubuc, the chief executive of A+E Networks, wasn’t sure about the final shot of the burning cross.

She was screening promos for “Generation KKK,” a documentary series about people trying to escape the Ku Klux Klan at the company’s New York headquarters during a meeting to plot out the rebranding of several cable channels. More than a year in the works, the series was set to debut on A&E this month as much of the country is still absorbing the results of a contentious presidential election during which white supremacy emerged as a hot topic.

Ms. Dubuc, 48 years old, is both the youngest and only female chief executive in the media industry, knew the show was a big risk. “My number one concern about this is that people just don’t want to deal with this,” she told the network executives gathered in the room.

Within a week, outcry over concerns that the show was “normalizing” the KKK led A&E to change the series’s name to “Escaping the KKK,” and then the discovery that the production company had paid some of the show’s participants forced A&E to scrap it altogether.

The episode illustrates just how much pressure Ms. Dubuc, who joined A+E Networks in 1999, is under to find shows edgy enough to break through the clutter.

A+E Networks, a joint venture of Hearst and the Walt Disney Co., not long ago was a golden child of basic cable. Today it is a prime example of the kind of mid-tier cable programmer that must revamp its brands to stand out in an age of slimmer channel bundles and on-demand streaming services.

The mother of two, who showed up to the rebranding meeting wearing a black leather vest and tailored jacket with her wet hair pulled back in a bun, landed her current job in 2013. She had a reputation as a bold programmer with the charmed touch, and famously pushed the staid, World War II-heavy History channel into new territory with the reality hit “Ice Road Truckers” during her first week in charge of the channel in 2007.

“Nancy is a risk taker,” said Abbe Raven, Ms. Dubuc’s mentor and predecessor as CEO.

By the time Ms. Dubuc ascended to the top job overseeing all of A+E Networks, hits such as “Duck Dynasty” on A&E and “The Bible” on History were reaching peak ratings of 9.4 million and 11 million total viewers, respectively—levels previously thought impossible for basic cable.

But last year, A&E and History averaged about half as many prime-time viewers in the key 18-49 demographic as they did in 2013, while Lifetime was down 69%, according to Nielsen. In recent months, however, A&E and Lifetime ratings have partially rebounded.

A+E Networks’ six-channel portfolio lately has born a disproportionate amount of the distribution declines plaguing the industry. Nielsen projects it will lose 2.9% of its households this month, the most of any network group, mostly due to subscriber losses at weaker channels such as FYI.

In response to the company’s recent challenges, Ms. Dubuc has been buying the international channels that previously were joint ventures, investing in growing digital-media companies such as Vice Media, and moving toward owning more scripted content through A&E Studios.

During the past three years, A+E Networks says it boosted its international revenue 73% and international earnings 57%. That, however, hasn’t been enough to drive overall growth. The closely held company had $1.75 billion in profit in the fiscal year ended in September, down slightly from $1.8 billion the previous year, according to a person familiar with the matter. Revenue was flat at $3.5 billion.

Ms. Dubuc’s investment in Vice Media gave A+E Networks about a 20% stake in the digital-media darling and involved swapping the History channel spinoff H2 for the new Viceland channel.

She gave Viceland co-presidents Eddy Moretti and Spike Jonze, novices to programming a 24-hour television channel, bowling balls as a symbol of how they should resist putting up the creative equivalent of guardrails along a bowling lane. Or, as Mr. Moretti summed up Ms. Dubuc’s advice, “f--- the guardrails.”

Since its launch in February, Viceland’s fledgling audience is growing but hasn’t cracked 100,000. “It takes a long time for things to get off the ground,” Ms. Dubuc said in a recent interview.

A+E Networks has been successful in getting core channels into new online packages such as Sling TV and DirecTV Now, but Ms. Dubuc is taking nothing for granted. She currently is overhauling A+E Networks’ three main brands—A&E, History and Lifetime—to better position them for an increasingly on-demand world.

For History and Lifetime the work is slightly easier because they target clearly defined audiences of men and women, respectively. A&E’s brand has been more difficult to crystallize because it started out as an “arts and entertainment” channel, but in recent years has become a reality-TV powerhouse, with shows such as “Dog the Bounty Hunter.”

As the aging “Duck Dynasty” heads toward its fifth and final season, A&E is refreshing its brand with new nonfiction shows such as “Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath,” which made its debut in November to the strongest ratings on the channel in two years.

“It never seems like a good idea to do something that’s way out there,” Ms. Dubuc said. “But usually the thing that’s way out there is where we are heading.”

During the recent rebranding meeting, Lifetime executives were brainstorming about filming real women’s lives to promote the channel. They sprang an idea on their boss: doing one of the promos about her.

Ms. Dubuc hesitated, but then she realized the power of the image.

“You should film me in the boardroom,” she joked. “Where are all the other women? There has to be one around here someplace…maybe under the table?”

Write to Keach Hagey at keach.hagey@wsj.com

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fxer
1 day ago
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"She had a reputation as a bold programmer with the charmed touch, and famously pushed the staid, World War II-heavy History channel into new territory with the reality hit “Ice Road Truckers” during her first week in charge of the channel in 2007."

So you're the asshole who wrecked the History channel
Bend, Oregon
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Anonymous E-mail Server Admin Interrogated at U.S. border and equipment seized

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After my trip in Hamburg, Germany, for the 33rd Chaos Communication Congress, I left Germany for the United States for a short vacation to visit family and friends. Upon my arrival in the United States, I was detained by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) where my belongings were picked apart and I was asked lots of strange, some offensive questions about my personal life. I refused to answer any questions and instead gave them the contact information for my lawyer. They demanded I decrypt my phone so they could "make sure there isn't any bad stuff on there". When I told them no, they said they would seize all of my electronics and search all of them for "contraband". I persisted and they seized about $2,000 worth of electronics and told me I would "get them back". We'll see about that. In total I was detained over 3 hours by CBP alone, and despite that CBP documentation says that I can notify someone of my detainment if I have been detained for more than 2 hours, I was not allowed to even after that point. This seems to have been a violation of CBP policy.

Sorry for spilling shit on it.

As you can see, "all electronics" doesn't just mean storage devices. I had always physically removed my SSD from my computer because I hypothesized it might have been this way, but no, they even took my micro USB cable because it can technically plug into my kindle which can plug into my laptop which can plug into my phone so they took it. Bastards.

I had brought both pairs of headphones and the microphone I use for voice chat, so until I replace those I don't have a way outside of my phone to talk to people over voice.

All of my devices are encrypted. Though I'll be doing some key rotation as a result of this, I'm confident none of the devices will be able to be decrypted.

I have an insurance file of sorts given to certain trustees which is to be used in just about this exact case. Without going into too much detail, this file when properly decrypted can be used to regain access to the tools I need to work on cock.li and do my job. I successfully received this file, but wasn't able to decrypt it because I couldn't remember the passphrase. Must have been something super duper secure.

Since that didn't work out, I took the next 3 weeks and took a real vacation. I checked on the site's status page to make sure there were no problems, but since everything was more or less fine, I just came back to Romania when I was finished doing all the cool shit I wanted to do. Things were less than ideal, but it felt really refreshing to take some time away from it all, you know?

There was only one person who purchased a cockbox in this time, and any cockbox customer who was inconvenienced by my absence will receive a nice fluffy credit to make up for it.

On my leaving the U.S., I was also stopped by two CBP officers, who pulled me into a private area (the jetway for my flight that was unused at the time) and questioned me again. These officers refused to identify themselves to me at all, which is interesting considering all of the officers on my inbound flight identified themselves. They went through my carry-on bag -- my checked bag was already checked, and though I know TSA opened up and went through my checked bag, I don't know if it was a customs inspection. My only phone was an unlocked burner I had purchased and had only porn open in my browser, so I let them search it which seemed to quench their thirst and cleared me for my flight (or maybe they just like nude anime girls with MAGA hats -- me too).

My future plans include implementing a periodic review of my insurance file, including decrypting, using, and updating it so I can travel over the border without getting harassed in the future.

I'd like to extend a special thanks to all of my friends that pulled together to make my trip easier for me. Whether it was checking on my home servers, contacting other people I couldn't reach, answering questions to quell fears I had died / been compromised, or providing me with server resources where I could store photos I took during my trip, you all made this trip a breeze and though the circumstances could have been better, I really did enjoy my vacation.

Unfortunately, though it will depend if I get my electronics back and what my lawyer comes back with regarding why I was repeatedly searched, it seems I will not be coming to DEFCON this year. Sorry.


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Philadelphia Poised to Ban Employers from Asking Hires About Salary History

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fxer
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Bend, Oregon
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