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Justin Fairfax, The King of Confederate Shade, Shuts Down 100-Year Tribute to American Traitors

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Most politicians don’t really understand power.

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fxer
46 minutes ago
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“Now if you didn’t take Treason 101 in high school...perhaps you also didn’t learn that Robert E. Lee, as head of the Confederate Army, is responsible for more American deaths than the Nazis.”

Wonder if people realize that more Americans died in the civil war than nearly all our other wars combined. wwi + wwii + Vietnam + revolutionary + 1812 + waronterror...
Bend, Oregon
hannahdraper
3 hours ago
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Washington, DC
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Welcome to the service mesh era: Introducing a new Istio blog post series

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Adopting a microservices architecture brings a host of benefits, including increased autonomy, flexibility, and modularity. But the process of decoupling a single-tier monolithic application into smaller services introduces new obstacles: How do you know what's running? How do you roll out new versions of your services? How do you secure and monitor all those containers?   

To address these challenges, you can use a service mesh: software that helps you orchestrate, secure, and collect telemetry across distributed applications. A service mesh transparently oversees and monitors all traffic for your application, typically through a set of network proxies that sit alongside each microservice. Adopting a service mesh allows you to decouple your application from the network, and in turn, allows your operations and development teams to work independently.

Alongside IBM, Lyft, and others, Google launched Istio in 2016 as an open-source service mesh solution. Built on the high-performance Envoy proxy, Istio provides a configurable overlay on your microservices running in Kubernetes. It supports end-to-end encryption between services, granular traffic and authorization policies, and unified metrics— all without any changes to your application code.  

Istio’s architecture is based on trusted service mesh software used internally at Google for years. And much in the same way we brought Kubernetes into the world, we wanted to make this exciting technology available to as many users as possible. To that end, we recently announced the beta availability of Istio on GKE, an important milestone in our quest to deliver a managed, mature service mesh that you can deploy with one click. You also heard from us about our vision for a service mesh that spans both the Cloud and on-prem.

To kick off 2019, we thought we'd take a step back and dive deep into how you can use Istio right now, in production. This is the first post in a practical blog series on Istio and service mesh, where we will cover all kinds of user perspectives, from developers and cluster operators to security administrators and SREs. Through real use cases, we will shed light on the "what" and "how" of service mesh— but most importantly, how Istio can help you deliver immediate business value to your customers.

To start, let's explore why Istio matters in the context of other ongoing shifts in the cloud-native ecosystem: towards abstraction from infrastructure, towards automation, and towards a hybrid cloud environment.

Automate everything  

The world of modern software moves quickly. Increasingly, organizations are looking for ways to automate the development process from source code to release, in order to address business demands and increase velocity in a competitive landscape. Continuous delivery is a pipeline-based approach for automating application deployments, and represents a key pillar in DevOps best practices.

Istio's declarative, CRD-based configuration model integrates seamlessly with continuous delivery systems, allowing you to incorporate Istio resources into your deployment pipelines. For example, you can configure your pipeline to automatically deploy Istio VirtualServices to manage traffic for a canary deployment. Doing so lets you leverage Istio's powerful features—from granular traffic management to in-flight chaos testing—with zero manual intervention. With its declarative configuration model, Istio can also work with modern GitOps workflows, where source control serves as the central source of truth for your infrastructure and application configuration.

Serverless, with Istio  

Serverless computing, meanwhile, transforms source code into running workloads that execute only when called. Adopting a serverless pattern can help organizations reduce infrastructure costs, while allowing developers to focus on writing features and delivering business value.

Serverless platforms work well because they decouple code and infrastructure. But most of the time, organizations aren’t only running serverless workloads— they also have stateful applications, including microservices apps on Kubernetes infrastructure. To address this, several open-source, Kubernetes-based serverless platforms have emerged in the open-source community. These platforms allow Kubernetes users to deploy both serverless functions and traditional Kubernetes applications onto the same cluster.

Last year, we released Knative, a new project that provides a common set of building blocks for running serverless applications on Kubernetes. Knative includes components for serving requests, handling event triggers, and building containerized functions from source code. Knative Serving is built on Istio, and brings Istio's telemetry aggregation and security-by-default to serverless functions.

Knative aims to become the standard across Kubernetes-based serverless platforms. Further, the ability to treat serverless functions as services in the same way you treat traditional containers will help provide much-needed uniformity between the serverless and Kubernetes worlds. This standardization will allow you to use the same Istio traffic rules, authorization policies, and metrics pipelines across all your workloads.

Build once, run anywhere

As Kubernetes matures, users are increasingly adopting more complex cluster configurations. Today, you might have several clusters, not one. And those clusters might span hybrid environments, whether in the public cloud, in multiple clouds, or on-prem. You might also have microservices that have to talk to single-tier applications running in virtual machines, or service endpoints to manage and secure, or functions to spin up across clusters.

Driven by the need for lower latency, security, and cost savings, the era of multi-cloud is upon us, introducing the need for tools that span both cloud and on-prem environments.

Released with 1.0, Istio Multicluster is a feature that allows you to manage a cross-cluster service mesh using a single Istio control plane, so you can take advantage of Istio's features even with a complex, multicluster mesh topology. With Istio Multicluster, you can use the same security roles across clusters, aggregate metrics, and route traffic to a new version of an application. The multicluster story gets easier in 1.1, as the new Galley component helps synchronize service registries between clusters.

Cloud Services Platform is another example of the push towards interoperable environments, combining solutions including Google Kubernetes Engine, GKE On-Prem, and Istio, towards the ultimate goal of creating a seamless Kubernetes experience across environments.

What's next?

Subsequent posts in this series will cover Istio's key features: traffic management, authentication, security, observability, IT administration, and infrastructure environments. Whether you're just getting started with Istio, or working to move Istio into your production environment, we hope this blog post series will have something relevant and actionable for you.

We're excited to have you along for the ride on our service mesh journey. Stay tuned!

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fxer
6 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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The Best Wireless Car Phone Charger Mounts

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We spent more than 100 hours researching 11 wireless-charging smartphone car mounts, and testing six of the most promising models, to find that Scosche’s StuckUp Qi is the best one for most people who have a phone that supports the Qi wireless-charging standard (which includes the latest iPhones and many Android phones). The StuckUp Qi charged our iPhone 8 faster than any other Wireless Power Consortium–certified charger we tested—it was more than 50 percent quicker than the next-fastest model. And speed matters more in the car, where you’re likely to be using maps and streaming while trying to top up your phone.

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fxer
6 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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The 33 Best Pens for 2019: Gel, Ballpoint, Rollerball, and Fountain Pens

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The 33 Best Pens for 2019: Gel, Ballpoint, Rollerball, and Fountain Pens

The title of “The Best Pen” is a weighty one—not everyone wants the same things from their pens, and what makes for one person’s perfect pen may be intolerable to another. It’s also true that different types of pens aren’t directly comparable. The best fountain pen has different characteristics from the best gel pen, and the best pens for writing aren’t the same as the best pens for art.

To make this guide as useful as possible, we’ve limited our choices to the best pens in specific categories instead of ranking all of the pens together. We also link to more detailed guides wherever possible so that you can read more about our reasoning and see competing pens. We encourage you to explore, evaluate our picks, and draw your own conclusions—who knows, you might find your One True Pen!

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fxer
6 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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Angry With NFL After No-Call, Saints Fans Resort To Lawsuits, Billboards

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Saints fans aren

"We'll probably never get over it," Saints coach Sean Payton said after Sunday's championship game. The team's fans aren't over it, either — and they're getting creative in their outrage.

(Image credit: John Bazemore/AP)

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fxer
7 hours ago
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“Two Saints season-ticket holders are suing NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and the league for a range of damages, The New Orleans Advocate reports, including mental anguish, emotional trauma, "loss of enjoyment of life" and "distrust of the game which has become the National pastime."
Bend, Oregon
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Amphitheatre of Capua in Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Italy

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The ancient city of Capua was one of the most important cities in Italy during the epoch of the Roman civilization. Here, Anfiteatro Campano—the first of many Roman amphitheatres—housed the first gladiator school, starting a tradition that became a symbol of the Roman culture.

With a wide elliptical shape, measuring 170-meter-long major axis and a 139-meter-long minor axis, this is the second biggest amphitheatre ever built by Romans, behind only the Colosseum, which was itself modeled on Anfiteatro Campano. It was divided in four levels, with a total height of 46 meters and it was decorated with numerous statues.

Probably built in the 1st century BC, it was restored many times in the following centuries. After the fall of the Roman Empire, the amphitheatre was damaged by the Vandals and later destroyed, along with most of the city of Capua, by the Saracens. Later the ruins of the amphitheatre were used as a quarry of marble for the construction of the new Duomo and the Lombard Castle, but also many other buildings in the new nearby town established after the destruction of Capua. Only during the 18th century, the amphitheatre was declared a national monument and the depredation stopped.

Anfiteatro Campano was also the site of the first and most famous gladiator school. Here in 73 BC, the famous rebellion of Spartacus took place, with over 70 slave-gladiators escaping from the school and later defeating the Roman army sent to capture them. This event sparked a two-year war between the rebel slaves and gladiators, that gathered an army of 120,000 men, and the Roman Republic. Ultimately the rebellious army was defeated, but the events of the war influenced Roman politics for centuries.

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fxer
7 hours ago
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Bend, Oregon
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